All posts for the month March, 2018

Metrics for sunsetting systems

Really, these are similar metrics to what you would use to choose systems- except they’re often on the tail end of a choice made years ago. I frequently see multiple systems run in parallel that really should be integrated (e.g., why would one have separate time and access cards?).  If you’re going to choose between […]

Assessing risk (and pitfalls)

I’ve already mused a bit on project estimation, and I have an upcoming post about how to think about sunsetting systems.  It occurs to me that there are at least two more fundamental questions to address:  what does it mean to talk about the risk in a system, and what biases might we have when […]

Algorithms that are 80% good aren’t scary.

Leaving aside the difference between sensitivity and specificity: if people know the machine is sometimes wrong, it’s not so bad.  Things get scary when the machine is 99% or 99.9% accurate, and you’re caught on the wrong end of a presumption. I’ve often wondered, for example, how many people get picked up on warrants for […]

Vexing little bugs

I find that, particularly with geek stuff, I get hung up on tiny little details.  For example, I did a deep dive with Javascript and CSS the other week, trying to find out why I couldn’t get an input field to select all the text inside when I clicked on it.  This ties back to […]

2018 Law license reciprocity update

It’s been awhile since I blogged about the UBE and Kansas.  I was surprised that Kansas took an extra couple years to join, and even more surprised at the adoption in the northeast.  I had always assumed that jurisdictions such as California, Florida, Texas, and New York would maintain their own licensing regimes- but New […]

On project estimation

This may or may not be a series, but I wanted to dash off a few thoughts.  I have a feeling this post will come across as very stream-of-consciousness but will be clarified by followup posts. The essence of estimating projects is to evaluate two things: How long is it expected to take? What risks […]

Controversy and Conversation

For (I think) the first time on this blog, I’ve made a post password-protected.  I don’t really want to make that a regular habit, but the subject matter is sufficiently nuanced and potentially controversial that I wanted to let a few trusted folks review it before I made my position globally visible. Fundamentally, this issue […]

Protected: On crime statistics

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.